Category: Southeast Asian Gaming

EQHO and Bug-Tracker Sign Strategic Partnership for Expansion of Southeast Asian and Canadian Games Markets

Game developers benefit from single-sourced suite of Asian game localization and testing services

Montreal 24 November 2016: Montreal-based Bug-Tracker Laboratories, dedicated to quality assurance and localization testing in the video gaming industry, announced today the signing of a strategic partnership with Singapore-based EQHO Globalization, a specialists in Asian game localization.

Both companies count major gaming brands such as Bandai, Blizzard and EA as clients, so the partnership will accelerate the Asian language localization-to-testing process by providing game developers with a suite of integrated games localization, multilingual voice production, testing and QA services. Bug-Tracker had a presence in China for six years so will leverage this experience for a strategic re-entry into the lucrative Southeast Asian markets, which is poised to grow to $2.2 billion by 2017. Bug-Tracker will establish secure testing facilities within EQHO’s Bangkok production center, whilst EQHO will benefit by establishing a physical presence in the $3 billion Canadian games market.

“We’re excited about the growth opportunities brought about by this mutually beneficial partnership”, stated Antoine Carre, President of Bug-Tracker Laboratories. “Our services complement each other, resulting in the further development of activity in the emerging Southeast Asian market, ultimately promoting and contributing to its growth. A joint venture with EQHO is our ultimate goal.”

Commenting on the recently penned agreement, Phanitanan Sanitprachakorn, EQHO’s Group CEO, said, “Bug-Tracker broadens and deepens our game testing services so we can better serve our clients with a more integrated service portfolio. We are looking forward to making the partnership work, take advantage of the respective geographical expansion we are providing each, whilst leveraging EQHO’s 20 years of Asian game localization expertise along the way”.

The Asian games market has grown 10.7% year-on-year compared to an industry average of 8.5% and, according to Newzoo, Asia represents 58% of the growth of the global games market. As games developers look East to drive more revenues, EQHO is rolling out consulting services to provide market entry strategies, partner identification and distribution channels, especially in ‘Big 6’ markets, namely Indonesia, Malaysia, Philippines, Singapore, Thailand and Vietnam, for global games developers.

 

About EQHO

Headquartered in Raffles Place, Singapore, and with end-to-end production centers in Thailand and Laos, EQHO Globalization Pte. Ltd. delivers complex, multi-discipline translation and multilingual voice services to global brand leaders, including 23 of the Forbes Top 30 companies. In 2015, EQHO’s team of 3,500 linguists translated 80 million words into 60 languages and delivered 51,666 minutes of multilingual audio. EQHO is ISO 9001:2015 and ISO 17100:2015 certified by Intertek, and is recognized by the Common Sense Advisory as one of Asia’s fastest growing language service providers.

About Bug-Tracker Labs

The many services offered at Bug-Tracker Laboratories include functionality, localization and certification testing in a wide range of mobile applications, PC, console and virtual reality games. Through their 18 years of experience in the gaming industry, Bug-Tracker has developed the most efficient processes and methodologies to accompany you to success through the last steps before the launch of your titles. For more information, visit www.bug-tracker.com.

 

Challenges to entering the mobile gaming market abroad

Breaking into Asian mobile games markets is no cakewalk. While some games, like Clash of Clans, enjoy multi-year runs of wild popularity, they are the exception rather than the rule. Most mobile games release quickly, gain popularity fast, and fade away to make room for the next game just as quickly. Time is of the essence, but there’s good news: Since mobile games usually rely on action-oriented game play with simpler graphics, less text and character restrictions, and little or no voiceover work, they don’t take very long to localize!

That’s a good thing, because to stay on top of the market, you have to come in already localized with a system in place for simultaneous delivery (which a full-service localization company can facilitate). You’ll also need a local partner for distribution and/or monetization.

From there, you’ll need to master the finer points of what makes each country’s mobile players tick – or tap, as the case may be.

A few top-tips on what makes who tick (or tap) in Asia

Japan

Japanese players expect in-game social interaction, like combat between guilds.

South Korea

South Korean gamers have come to expect frequent game updates and special in-game events.

China

China has more than 15 app stores – which is a significant change from just dealing with two (Apple and Google’s) – as well as networks selling games, and middlemen at telecom companies and hardware manufacturers.

In general, Asian gamers are better conditioned for more complicated games than Western audiences – your game might be too simple for them. There’s a reason Angry Birds took off in the U.S. and not so much in Japan!

Find out more by downloading our eBook…

Why Southeast Asia?

We’re starting in Southeast Asia precisely because so few people do. You know you want into the South Korean and Japanese markets. And China? That country is the largest gaming nation in the world.

But the six countries that make up Southeast Asia are vital, active, game-hungry markets too.

Meet the Big Six
Thailand, Indonesia, Malaysia, Singapore, Vietnam and the Philippines.

Newzoo estimates that revenues in the Southeast Asian games market will double to $2.2 billion by 2017.

These regions are young – as in the majority of their populations are in the target age ranges for game playing – between 15 to 54 years old.[i] Newzoo also estimates that these countries hold a total of 126.2 million gamers, 59.7 million of whom pay for the privilege.

Find out more…